2015 was the year where traditional business models were transformed by entrepreneurial companies recognizing an industry void. An example of this is the on-demand market place with companies like Uber and AirBnB.

Simultaneously, a transformation occurred as companies reevaluated their philosophies around customer service. What use to be handled by operators is now addressed through online chats or a redirect to an FAQ page. It’s more important than ever to place the consumer at the center of the experience by empowering them with the insights and technology that improve every aspect of their journey. The alternative is backlash of negative brand sentiment across social media and potentially losing them forever as a customer.  With Health Insurance ranking within the bottom five out of 43 other sectors in customer satisfaction, no other industry is more ready to embrace a much needed overhaul of how they approach customer experience.

It’s imperative to the overall financial benefit of the company for CEOs to understand that the customer is their guest as opposed to an unwanted visitor. In summary to the story below: “It’s easy to spot the companies that use customer experience as a strategic tool, and those that clearly don’t understand the importance of it. Technology has increased the gap between companies that are easy for customers to work with and those that aren’t.”


2015 was a year of disruption. In 2015 the world’s largest taxi company owns no taxis (Uber), the largest accommodation provider owns no real estate (Airbnb), the most popular media owner creates no content (Facebook), the largest telecom operator owns no telecom infrastructure (Skype and WeChat), the world’s largest software vendors don’t write the apps (Apple and Google) and the world’s largest movie house owns no cinemas (Netflix).*

Just as business models are changing, the way we engage with brands is changing too. Customer service as a category is evolving. Customer experience is no longer something handled purely by the contact center. But the contact center–the place where customers go for help–is becoming an increasingly key piece of a competitive business strategy. The contact center is the place where brands literally make “contact” with their customers. It’s becoming increasingly common for customer experience to be a key imperative for the c-suite. Business leaders understand the importance and power of providing an experience to customers–not purely a clumsy transaction (the current state of many customer service operations). While the Chief Customer Officer is arguably the most senior customer role within the company, the true owner of the customer experience is the CEO, the person responsible for the company’s performance. Today an unmemorable customer experience should be the thing that keeps every CEO up at night. The reason is (nine times out of ten) this customer experience is the only thing differentiating a company from others. In the future it will become even more important.

CEOs today need to understand the power of treating customers like they are guests in their home, rather than unwanted annoyances. It’s easy to spot the companies that use customer experience as a strategic tool, and those that clearly don’t understand the importance of it. Technology has increased the gap between companies that are easy for customers to work with and those that aren’t. Let’s focus on the modern customer engagement practices that are being leveraged by leading edge companies. Read the entire story here